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Coalition Participants

Member Congregations

for translations of these descriptions, please scroll to the bottom of the page and click the “translations” link

Congregation of Bon Secours of Paris (CBS)
Board Representative: Fran Gorsuch, Secretary/Treasurer

Since 1842, the Sisters of Bon Secours have dedicated themselves to bringing “Good Help to Those In Need,” bringing compassion, healing, and liberation to those they serve. Whether in healthcare, education, or social services, in hospitals, clinics, or parishes, in towns and cities or isolated villages, Bon Secours responds to a universal need: To provide to all who suffer a reason to live and a reason to hope. They serve in many international communities including France, Ireland, Great Britain, United States, Peru and South Africa. Believing that the call of the Gospel is to proclaim and participate in accomplishing God’s hope for the world, they continue the healing mission of Jesus. Their Mission Focus states; “We, Women of Healing, commit ourselves to defend and care for all creation; to cry out with others against injustice and all that diminishes life on Earth.”

Click here to visit their website.

Brigidine Sisters (CSB)
Board Representative: Kathleen Butler

The Brigidine Sisters are a diverse group of women inspired by the person of Jesus and the vision of Brigid of Kildare and Daniel Delany. Since their foundation in 1807 in the wake of the penal days in Ireland, they have been committed to work for social justice, to live in a spirit of right relationship with the sacred community of planet Earth, and to be a prophetic voice in solidarity with the oppressed—those living in poverty, particularly women and children, refugees and migrants, Aborigines and similar groups. Today they work in formal and informal ways as advocates of marginalized people, and as contributors to policy and structural change through Justice Committees and Peace and Justice Networks. In the spirit of Brigid’s monastic tradition, the congregation also has centers of spirituality to provide hospitality, healing, compassion, hope and healing for all.

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Click here to visit their website.

Carmelite Sisters of Charity Vedruna (CCV)
Board Representative: Maureen Foltz

The Carmelite Sisters of Charity Vedruna were born in Vic, Spain on 26 February 1826 through the initiative of an extraordinary woman, Joaquina de Vedruna y de Mas. That first community is alive today in more than 2000 sisters of “every race and nation” (Rev. 7,9) present in diverse countries of Europe, America, Asia, and Africa. They are present where life is threatened, to enable a culture of peace and non-violence and support the groups that are in situations of frontier and risk…They are present where there is unsustainable damage to the planet, to revive ecological awareness, encourage every seed of life,and give impulse to sustainable development…They are present where there is a deep emptiness of meaning in life created by consumerist and materialist life styles, to proclaim in transparency and simplicity the Gospel of Jesus, as a way that leads to true life.

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Congrégation de Notre-Dame (CND)
Board Representative: Stacy Hanrahan, President

The Congrégation de Notre-Dame is a Catholic community of women religious of apostolic faith founded in the 17th century by Marguerite Bourgeoys, first educator of Montreal and a pioneer of New France. They come from countries in North America, Central America, Asia, Africa, and Europe; in eight countries they live and work among the people in several fields including education, social and environmental justice. “To follow Jesus in a preferential option for the poor and to live [their] mission of liberating education in fidelity to the prophetic charism of Marguerite Bourgeoys,” the Sisters of the Congrégation de Notre-Dame participate actively in the transformation of society for a more just world. They prepare students to become the agents of their own personal transformation, and to become responsible citizens of the world, concerned and involved in the transformation of society and the care of the planet. The CND’s Social Justice Network concentrates its efforts on the status of women, the trafficking of women and children, environmental issues, and human rights.

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Click here to visit their website.

Congregation of Our Lady of Sion (NDS)
Board Representative: Sylvia Obrigewitsch

The Sion Sisters are an international congregation of vowed women, both contemplative and apostolic, who are rooted in the Scriptures. They minister in 22 countries around the world, keeping before the Church the awareness of God’s faithful love for the Jewish people and the biblical requirement “to do justice, to love tenderly and walk humbly with your God” Micah – 6:8. They are women who set out “To Heal a Fractured World” by building bridges of understanding among Christians, Jews, Muslims and all faith traditions, by working for justice, peace and love among the people of the world, and by choosing life, including life in all creation, in all that they do. In July 2010, they called themselves to stand beside both the Israeli and Palestinian peoples in their suffering; a call to be women of dialogue; and a call to stewardship as they hear the urgent “groaning of creation”. Their ministries include education, social work, micro-financing, and midwifery.

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Click here to visit their US-Canada website, or click here to visit their general website.

Congregation of Sisters of Saint Agnes (CSA)
Board Representative: Sally Ann Brickner, OSF

The Congregation of Sisters of St. Agnes was founded in 1858 by Fr. Caspar Rehrl, an Austrian missionary to the immigrant German settlers in the Fox Rivers Valley of Wisconsin. These women of the frontier established their Motherhouse in Fond du Lac, WI and set off teaching in schools from Wisconsin, Kansas to Pennsylvania and New York, establishing hospitals, serving in orphanages, and staffing a hostel to aid newly-arrived German immigrants in New York City, later establishing missions in Nicaragua. Today they engage in promoting systemic change for the quality of life through their sponsored institutions, furthering economic justice for the poor and the role of women in church and society.

Click here to visit their website.

Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame (SND)

Board Representative: Shauna Bankemper, SND

The Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame was founded in 1850 by Hilligonda Wolbring in Coesfeld, Germany to care for orphan children. Since its founding the congregation has spread to 19 countries on 5 continents with a membership of over 2,000 sisters. The congregation considers St. Julie Billiart, foundress of the Sisters of Noter Dame de Namur, its spiritual mother. The spiritual orientation of the congregation is Ignatian. As Sisters of Notre Dame we are missioned to incarnate the love of our Good and Provident God. Centered in Jesus Christ, united as a community in his love and in the spirit of Mary, we share a life of faith and joyful simplicity, ready to take up our cross daily in love. Consecrated for mission in the Church, we serve people, especially those who experience poverty in its various forms, through education and other ministries. We place special emphasis on catechesis so that we may help others to grow in faith and confidence in God our Father.

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Daughters of Wisdom (DW) 

Board Representative: Jean Quinn

The Daughters of Wisdom were founded in France in 1703 by St. Louis Marie de Montfort and Blessed Marie Louise Trichet. Their shared inspiration was Divine Wisdom and their longing to make Her known and loved. Marie Louise lived this inspiration with the first Daughters of Wisdom among the poor and most excluded people in society. Today the Daughters of Wisdom number is about 1388 women working in Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America and Oceana. They continue to seek and reveal the love of Wisdom as they respond to the various needs and challenges of the 21st Century in creative and holistic ways, denouncing all forms of injustice, affirming their priority for those on the margins of society. “Wisdom cries aloud in the street, in the open squares she raises her voice; down the crowded ways she calls out, at the city gates she utters her words…” (Pr.1 20-21)

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Handmaids of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (ACI)
Board Representative: Margaret Scott

The Handmaids of the Sacred Heart of Jesus were founded by Saint Raphaela Mary Porras in Spain in 1877. An international community of Roman Catholic women of all ages, races, and cultural backgrounds, the Handmaids are now living and ministering in 27 different countries, all over the world. They are Eucharistic women, whose gift and commitment is to be bread broken and wine poured out for God and for others, and their Ignatian spirituality, centered on the following of the poor and humble Christ, permeates and deepens every aspect of their lives as Handmaids. Their world view contemplates every person on the planet with tenderness and redemptive power.

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Holy Union Sisters (SUSC)
Board Representative: Mary Jean Audette

The Holy Union Sisters, an international Congregation of Roman Catholic women religious, was founded in France in the 1820’s. Through our many ministries, including education, social services, health care, pastoral care, and parish ministry, we strive to bring our charism of unity and reconciliation to different cultures, ethnic groups, the deprived and marginalized. Today, we are engaged in education, health care, spiritual direction, environmental issues, human trafficking, community empowerment, immigration and protection of the rights of refugees – ministering in 14 countries on 4 continents.

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Click here to visit their website.

Marist Sisters
Board Representative: Anne McCabe

The Marist Sisters are a small international Congregation, present in fourteen countries around the world – in Europe, South America, North America and Africa, Asia and the Pacific. Originated in post-Revolution France it was born of a simple idea: a religious family, bearing the name of Mary, who would live her spirit, aspiring – to think, to judge, to feel, to act as Mary. (Jean-Claude Colin, Founder). Their two founders, Jean-Claude Colin and Jeanne-Marie Chavoin, had a deep sense of God’s call to be instruments of divine mercy, bringing healing, reconciliation, respect and compassion to all, especially to those who find themselves on the margins of society and Church.  So there are Marist Sisters in schools and hospitals, in prisons and parishes, in the homes of the poor and centres for the homeless. You find them alongside the displaced, the frightened, the lost, the searching, the grieving. They are involved in anti-trafficking groups, justice and peace organisations and local action groups providing a voice for the voiceless. Living the Gospel message of love and mercy – attuned to the needs of the people among whom we live – has been, and always will be, the Marist way. Read more »

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Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart (MSC) – Stella Maris Province
Board Representative: Karol Brewer

The Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (MSCs) are members of an international missionary institute of women religious, founded by St. Frances Cabrini, present on 6 continents and in 15 countries of the world. The Institute is comprised of three provinces and three regions. The Stella Maris Province encompasses ministries in Australia, Swaziland, and the United States. There are also provinces in Italy and Brazil, three regions in Argentina/Paraguay, Central America and Western Europe and a mission in Ethiopia. Their varied ministries include a high school and college, retreat center, nursing homes, senior housing and eldercare, immigration legal and social services, and three shrines dedicated to Mother Cabrini in NYC, Chicago and Colorado (USA). Other ministries include care of HIV/AIDs patients and orphans, water/farming programs, schools, and health clinics in Swaziland and a Health System of hospitals, nursing home, rehabilitation centers and palliative care in Australia. Read more »

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Religious of Jesus and Mary (RJM)
Board Representative: Kathleen Scanlon

The Religious of Jesus and Mary are an international congregation of 1200 + Catholic sisters who have shared the Church’s mission in the United States since 1877. Committed to the apostolic call and style of St. Claudien Thévenet, who founded the congregation in 1818, they serve in various educational, pastoral, social, and spiritual ministries in 16 provinces and two delegations [Africa/Peru], with general headquarters in Rome, Italy.  Their sisters and associates, the Family of Jesus and Mary [FJM] are present in twenty-eight countries. Their work includes schools, anti-trafficking work, HIV/AIDS, and various ministries with the poor. In the USA province, they sponsor QUEST, a volunteer project for Haiti.

“In a world where human rights are trampled and natural resources are abused, we STAND WITH . . . WOMEN who have been used and exploited. . . DISPLACED PERSONS. . . DEFENSELESS CHILDREN, victims of abandonment, sexual trafficking and abuse. . . We want to work together in CARING FOR OUR EARTH and educating others in the responsible use of its resources. . .”

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Click here to visit their website.

Religious Sisters of Charity – Ireland and Australia (RSC)
Board Representative: Suzette Clark

The Religious Sisters of Charity were founded in Ireland in 1815 by Mary Aikenhead, when she began a ministry with the poor and with orphans, which expanded into hospital, prison, and school ministry. They were the first congregation of women to work with people in their homes in Ireland. The sisters take a fourth vow of Service to the Poor, and are now living and working on three continents: Europe, Africa and America. In 1838 sisters were sent to work in Australia and, due to difficulty with communication at that time, were encouraged in 1842 to form a separate congregation now known as the Sisters of Charity of Australia. Both congregations share joint membership to UNANIMA International. In Australia, ministries of Sisters of Charity include prisons, parishes, health, adult education, schools, social justice and advocacy. The Religious Sisters of Charity are also in England, Scotland, Zambia, California, Venezuela, Nigeria and Malawi.  They have novitiates in Zambia and Nigeria and the youth and energy of their young sisters there are evident in their response to their many and varied ministries. The community continues to be involved in catechetical programmes at parish/diocese/national level, in healthcare, education, and all areas of social care including HIV/AIDS, human trafficking, refugees and migrants.

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Click here to visit their Ireland website, or click here to visit their Australia website.

Sisters of Providence (SP)
Board Representative: Mary Kaye Nealen

Blessed Emilie Tavernier-Gamelin founded the Congregation of the Sisters of Providence, a Catholic religious community, in Montréal in 1843, in response to the needs of the poor, the sick, and the marginalized. Today, they are present in Canada, the United States, El Salvador, Argentina, Chile, Haiti, Cameroon, Egypt and the Philippines. Their active apostolic life engages them in charitable and pastoral commitments in the areas of health, education, and social service, and in the promotion of social and ecological justice. They challenge themselves to live compassionate love and creative, prophetic solidarity and to BE PROVIDENCE with those who live in poverty–those whose needs are not met, victims of injustice, the rejected, marginalized and voiceless. They fight injustice, share their lives in community, follow the Earth Charter, act as spiritual companions, work with the mentally ill and drug addicts, AIDS patients, street people, and immigrants.

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Click here to visit their website.

Sisters of Saint Anne (SSA)
Board Representative: Lucille Goulet

As Gospel women, Sisters of Saint Anne walk together as they follow Jesus Christ in today’s world. Continuing the mission bequeathed to them by their foundress, Esther Blondin (1809-1890), they seek to help their brothers and sisters grow in truth, freedom and life, by responding to needs in education, healthcare, youth ministry and social advocacy. Founded in Vaudreuil, a village near Montreal, today they are present in Canada, the United States, Cameroun, Haiti and Chile. United and in solidarity with others, particularly with women, youth, the poor and the marginalized, immigrants, trafficked people, and First Nations, they seek to act on the level of systemic change. Some areas of special concern are the promotion and defense of the fundamental rights of other human beings, notably the right to education, affordable housing, health care, and fresh drinking water.

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Click here to visit their website.

Sisters of the Divine Savior (SDS)
Board Representative: Ellen Sinclair, Vice-President

The Sisters of the Divine Savior, commonly known as the Salvatorian Sisters, have about 1,200 sisters in 28 countries on five continents. Their mission is to make known the goodness and kindness of the Savior in all ways that the Spirit inspires. Current ministries include education, healthcare, anti-human trafficking, pastoral, social services, and justice works, among others. They work closely with the Society of the Divine Savior and International Community of the Divine Savior as the Salvatorian Family. The Salvatorian Sisters work collaboratively on many issues including anti-human trafficking, peace and justice issues, education, healthcare, migration and refugees, and those involving women and children. Their varied ministries include an orphanage in Sri Lanka, a child rights protection program in the Philippines, and educational / training programs in anti-trafficking work in the USA.

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Click here to visit their international website, or click here to visit their USA website.

Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary (SNJM)
Board Representative: Barbara Spears

Founded in 1843 at Longueuil, Quebec, the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary are one of the first Canadian congregations of women religious dedicated to the ministry of education. Inspired by the zeal of their foundress, Blessed Marie-Rose Durocher, they seek to respond to the challenges of today through various forms of education – education in the faith, education in schools, and education for justice. Over the years, the Congregation has expanded the idea of teaching to include informal as well as formal education, pastoral and social work, spirituality, the arts, scholarly research, promotion of justice and community organizing. SNJMs now serve in Brazil, Canada, Nicaragua, Peru, the United States, South Africa and Lesotho (Africa). The active SNJM Justice and Peace Network works with local, national and international groups to promote human rights and alleviate poverty with a special concern for women and children. In addition to its affiliation with UNANIMA International, the SNJM Congregation participates in two other non- Governmental Organizations: Development and Peace based in Canada and the Transformation Resource Centre in Lesotho, Africa. The Congregation has taken two corporate stands: to stop human trafficking and to promote water as a human right and public good. Read more »

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Society of the Holy Child Jesus (SHCJ)
Board Representative: Mary Akinwale

The Society of the Holy Child Jesus, founded by Cornelia Connelly in 1846, is an international community of Catholic women religious. The sisters serve in a variety of educational, pastoral, social, legal, and spiritual ministries, through which they continue their mission to help others understand that God lives and acts in them and in our world and to rejoice in God’s presence. The Holy Child Sisters are in North and South America, Europe and Africa, responding to the pressing needs of the world in the areas of: gender discrimination, empowerment of women and men, ecological issues and welfare of the planet, ecumenical ventures to promote unity, and refugees and immigrants. Included in their varied ministries are skills training in Chad, summer programs in Ghana, an EcoSpirituality newsletter / publications and micro-lending programs to alleviate poverty in the USA, a public interest law firm that does pro bono work for thousands of victims of human rights

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Click here to visit their website.

Sœurs de l’Assomption de la Sainte Vierge (SASV)
Board Representative: Judy Curley

The Congregation of The Sisters of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin was founded at Saint-Grégoire de Nicolet (Quebec, Canada), on September 8, 1853, by the Reverend Jean Harper. Four young women of his local parish generously responded to the call to help establish the Congregation in view of an educational mission. Today, Sisters and Associates continue to embrace the mission as educators for liberation. They call one another to be a witness and presence of Assumption hope in the world: a hope that reveals the love of God, a hope that is guided by an unfailing trust in Divine Providence, a hope that embraces with compassion and tenderness the impoverished, women, youth and the concerns of the cosmos. In recent years the Congregation has been recognized for its bold commitment to the environment, especially through the geothermal venture and other energy efficient measures implemented in renovation projects. Across continents and within diverse cultures the Congregation seeks to build bridges, establish covenants and open ever new pathways of hope. Presently The Sisters of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin serve in Brazil, Canada, Ecuador, Japan, and the USA. Read more »

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Ursuline Sisters of Mount Saint Joseph (OSU)
Board Representative: Dianna Ortiz

The Ursuline Sisters of Mount Saint Joseph, sustained by prayer and vowed life in community, proclaim Jesus through education and Christian formation in the spirit of their founder, Saint Angela Merici. The first teaching order of women in the Church (the Company of Saint Ursula) was founded in Brescia, Italy, in 1535. In 1874 a group of Ursulines from Louisville Kentucky moved to the site that is now Maple Mount, Kentucky, eventually becoming an autonomous congregation. The Ursuline Sisters of Mount Saint Joseph minister in the states of Kentucky, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Tennessee, Washington, D.C., and in Chile, South America. Ways that the community is actively engaged in UNANIMA issues include: playing a primary role in promoting the passage of a law making human trafficking a felony in Kentucky in 2007; receiving recognition at the national level for their work in environmental education and activities, including conversion of most of their buildings to geothermal; supporting the activities of one of their members who founded and serves as Executive Director of Water With Blessings, a project that empowers women to provide clean water for their families and villages. Read more »

Click here to visit their website.

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